NCERT Solutions for Class 11 English Woven Words Chapter 20

Ajamil and the Tigers Class 11

Chapter 20 Ajamil and the Tigers Exercise Answers & Summary

<< Previous Chapter 19 : Ode to a Nightingale Next Chapter 21 : My Watch >>

Understanding the poem : Solutions of Questions on Page Number : 142

Q1 :  

The poem has a literal level and a figurative level. Why has the poet chosen 'tigers' and 'sheep' to convey his message?


Answer :

Though literally the poem talks of a short story in which a shepherd made a concord with a king of tigers to maintain peace among the two communities. However, if one tries to gauge, there is more to it than just a jungle story. It speaks of the distinction between the proprietor and the proletariat. It is about the class struggle and the oppressor and the oppressed. The shepherd is the politician, the ruler, as depicted in the poem, and other sheep are subjects. The sheepdog, is the warrior, the army, to protect sheep. However, shepherd wants to maintain his sovereignty, so sacrifices a few sheep to maintain a cordial relation with the tigers and goes on signing the pact. It is depicted how the rulers sacrifice their people to maintain their regime.

Answer needs Correction? Click Here

Q2 :  

What facet of political life does the behaviour of Ajamil illustrate?


Answer :

The poem Ajamil and the Tigers is a political satire by Arun Kolatkar; Ajamil and the Tigers represent the corrupt politicians and the oppressed subjects. The sheep represent the mass, the mob; the sheepdog's is the incarnation of the army. It is to be seen how the commoners, sheep and sheepdog, are annihilated by the rulers, Ajamil. How their sentiments are overlooked. The poet has beautifully retold the fantastic story of Ajamil, the believed to be good shepherd, which he possibly heard in Jejuri. When the tigers are captured by the brave sheepdog, Ajamil lets them lose, despite being warned by the dog. To show his prominence, he did not listen to the sheepdog and did not even make any eye contact with him. Rather he offered a gala feast to the tigers and gave them gifts like sheep meat, skin and wool. The audacious warriors are paid no heed to and the subjects are sacrificed for Ajamil wanted to maintain his supremacy.

Answer needs Correction? Click Here

Q3 :  

Why have the words, 'pretended' and 'seemed' been used in the lines:

...Pretended to believe every single word

of what the tiger king said.

And seemed to be taken in by all the lies.

How does the sense of these lines connect with the line 'Ajamil wasn't a fool'?


Answer :

Please Register/Login to get access to all solutions Facebook Login
Q4 :  

Why did Ajamil refuse to meet the sheepdog's eyes?


Answer :

Please Register/Login to get access to all solutions Facebook Login
Q5 :  

'He is free to play a flute all day as well fed tigers and fat sheep drink from the same pond

with a full stomach for a common bond.'

What do the phrases 'play the flute all day' and 'a common bond' refer to?


Answer :

Please Register/Login to get access to all solutions Facebook Login
Q6 :  

The poem is a satire against the present political class. How effectively does it convey the anger and anguish of the common man trapped in the system?


Answer :

Please Register/Login to get access to all solutions Facebook Login
<< Previous Chapter 19 : Ode to a Nightingale Next Chapter 21 : My Watch >>

Woven Words - English : CBSE NCERT Exercise Solutions & Summary for Class 11th for Ajamil and the Tigers will be available online in PDF book form soon. The solutions are absolutely Free. Soon you will be able to download the solutions.

Popular Articles